NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Specs Possibly Leaked – GP107 GPU, 768 CUDA Cores, 1.38 GHz Boost and 75W TDP

0
15

Nvidia-Wallaper-widescreen-2

So far, NVIDIA has introduced a number of cards based on its latest Pascal micro-architecture. Including, Titan Pascal, GTX 1080, GTX 1070 and GTX 1060 6GB and 3GB variants. With those models, NVIDIA is able to cover price segments from $1,200 all the way down to $190, however until now the company seemed unwilling to bring their latest tech into the sub-$200 market where AMD currently offers a number of solutions including the $179 RX 470 and the $119 RX 460. Today, a very interesting leak appeared thanks to the folks over at Benchlife.

Pascal GP107 GPU – 768 CUDA Cores, 1.38 GHz Boost and 75W TDP

NVIDIA-GeForce-GTX-1050-Specifications

As you can see in the leaked image above, we have a GPU which features 768 CUDA cores,  128-bit memory interface and 4GB of GDDR5. We also have a GPU boost clock of 1.38GHz. Benchlife alleges that this is in fact the GP107-400 GPU, which indicates that it will be the fully-unlocked version of the GP107 GPU core, and not cut down in any way. If true, the GP107 GPU core would be the smallest of the Pascal GPUs released so far. The GPU will also apparently feature a TDP of 75W, which would mean it will likely not require any external power and instead be powered directly from the motherboard’s PCIe slot.

While all of this should be taken with a grain of salt, the specifications and timing do make a lot of sense to me. Currently, NVIDIA’s lowest end Pascal card is the $199 GTX 1060 3GB, which trades blows with AMD’s RX 470 in both pricing and performance. NVIDIA is missing a huge market with their lack of a sub-$150 option and I believe it is possible they plan on filling it soon with the GTX 1050. Reports suggest the card could be available as early as October, which would make it just in time for the League of Legends World Championship Finals indicating that NVIDIA may plan on seizing the opportunity to promote its new eSports aimed GPU.

 

Source: Benchlife

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.