wiki

CPU

The CPU, also known as the Central Processing Unit, is one of the core components in a computer that includes all the logic needed to process programming instructions. CPUs are often also referred to as processor or microprocessor. Some people erroneously refer to the entire computer as the CPU.

DDR4

DDR4 SDRAM, or just simply DDR4, stands for Double Data Rate 4th Generation Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory. DDR4 is the latest generation of DDR SDRAM and is the successor to the widely adopted DDR3 SDRAM.

DDR4 has numerous advantages over its predecessors including a lower operating voltage, faster speeds, higher capacity, and significantly improved error correction capabilities.

DHCP

DHCP, or Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, is a technology designed to allow clients to request a lease of an IP address from a pool (also know as a table) of available IPs at the time of the request. DHCP can also supply other information such as the subnet mask and default gateway.

The primary use of DHCP is to simplify the work of the network admin. It offloads the work of having to manually assign IPs and prevents IP conflicts among clients. It is an essential feature in both small home networks where consumers are unfamiliar with complicated network setup and large networks that have hundreds and thousands of clients.

FC SAN

FC SAN, or Fiber Channel Storage Area Network, is a type of SAN which uses fiber channel to connect servers and the SAN. Fiber channel is an ultra high speed technology designed for transmitting data at data up to 128Gb/s.

FiOS

FiOS is a term coined by Verizon for their Fiber Optic Service, a service that provides internet, voice or television services to homes and businesses.

Unlike DSL or cable, FiOS uses fiber optic cables to transmit signals, which allow for greater performance and longer signal travel distances compared to DSL or cable although fiber optic cables are significantly more expensive when compared to traditional copper cables such as those used for phone lines or cable TV.

Currently, the two major providers of FiOS service in the United States are Verizon Communications and Frontier Communications.

garbage collection

Definition:

1. Garbage Collection in software development simply means reclaiming resources used by data objects that can no longer be accessed. For example, if pointer A points to the address of an array and then points to another location without first deleting the array, then the array will forever take up a chunk of memory until the system is shut down. Garbage collection deletes such objects to reduce memory leaks.

2. Garbage collection in Solid State Drives (SSD) is the consolidation of useful data and separating it from garbage data. The operation is carried out by the SSD controller when the SSD is either active or idle depending on the implementation. By keeping valid data blocks separate from ones marked as re-writable, the SSD can maintain its peak performance for longer since blocks that are readily available are easier to find.

Gateron Switches

Gateron switches are Cherry MX “clone” mechanical keyboard switches manufactured by Gateron.

 

Gateron Red

Actuation Force (g): 45

Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2

Full Travel Distance (mm): 4

Lifespan: 50 Million

Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent)

Gateron Black

Actuation Force (g): 50

Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2

Full Travel Distance (mm): 4

Lifespan: 50 Million

Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent)

Gateron Clear

Actuation Force (g): 35

Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2

Full Travel Distance (mm): 4

Lifespan: 50 Million

Other Characteristics: Linear

Gateron Brown

Actuation Force (g): 45

Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2

Full Travel Distance (mm): 4

Lifespan: 50 Million

Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump

Gateron Blue

Actuation Force (g): 55

Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2

Full Travel Distance (mm): 4

Lifespan: 50 Million

Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump, Clicky

GPU scaling

GPU scaling is a feature of modern GPUs which is designed to help ensure that the image output fits the screen. GPU scaling is particularly useful in situations where the GPU is outputting a different resolution than the monitor or TV’s native resolution.

 

Should you enable GPU scaling?

Generally, GPU scaling should be disabled in situations where the GPU and application running on the GPU are both running at the monitor’s native resolution. GPU scaling introduces a small amount of input lag as the GPU needs to process the image to fit the attached screen.

However, if the GPU is not running at the native resolution or an application such as a game is not running at the monitor’s native resolution, GPU scaling should be enabled. The reason for this is because GPU scaling is far faster and more efficient than the internal scalers on most monitors and TVs, and will require the least amount of latency when scaling the images.

Greetech Switches

Greetech switches are Cherry MX “clone” switches manufactured by Greetech.

 

Common Greetech Mechanical Keyboard Switches

GT02 (Black)

Actuation Force (g): 80

Actuation Distance (mm): 2

Full Travel Distance (mm): 4

Lifespan: 50 Million

Other Characteristics: Linear

GT02 (Brown)

Actuation Force (g): 60

Actuation Distance (mm): 2

Full Travel Distance (mm): 4

Lifespan: 50 Million

Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump

GT02 (Blue)

Actuation Force (g): 60

Actuation Distance (mm): 2

Full Travel Distance (mm): 4

Lifespan: 50 Million

Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump, Click

GT02 (Red)

Actuation Force (g): 60

Actuation Distance (mm): 2

Full Travel Distance (mm): 4

Lifespan: 50 Million

Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent)

heatsink

The heatsink when used in the context of electronic devices is a metal structure, usually composed of aluminum fins and copper heat pipes, that wicks heat away from parts such as the CPU, GPU, and other hardware components that generate a lot of heat.

Heatsinks help cool electronic components in two ways: active and passive. Active cooling attaches a fan to the heatsink to dissipate heat more efficiently at the cost of noise, while passive cooling simply uses the heatsink by itself to dissipate heat at a lower efficiency.

Enthusiasts with high end, overclocked components will sometimes opt to use water cooling. Whereas air cooling uses a fan attached directly to the heatsink itself, water cooling uses a circulating hydraulic system to carry heat from the component to a device similar to a heatsink called a radiator which is then usually actively cooled with a fan.